Amanda Brumley

 Amanda Brumley-Gilmore-Foster

Amanda Brumley was my great grand-aunt. Her middle name was Elizabeth and people called her Mandy for short. She was born on July 3, 1855 in Herman, Gasconade, Missouri. Her parents were Willis Brumley and Mary "Polly" Johns. 

Amanda Brumley had three siblings and two half-siblings; William "Bill", Nancy Ann "Aunt Coon", John, Alice Florence and Isaac Walter (my great-grandfather) Brumley. Her mother died ca. 1860 sometime after her brother John Brumley was born in Mt. Sterling, Gasconade, Missouri.

On December 19, 1872 in Vienna, Maries, Missouri she married John Henry Gilmore at the age of seventeen years old. They had three children; William Willis, James Charles and David Samuel Gilmore. 

Amanda Brumley

Amanda Brumley for whatever reason left her marriage and her three children behind sometime between 1879 to 1886 in Osage County, Missouri. She apparently moved to another county and by doing so John Henry Gilmore could not find her and had to put an advertisement in the local paper stating the reasons why he was divorcing Amanda.

Amanda Brumley

On February 6, 1886 John Henry Gilmore was granted a divorce from Amanda Elizabeth Brumley in Maries County, Missouri.

On September 6, 1897 Amanda Brumley Gilmore married George W. Foster in Hermann, Gasconade, Missouri. They had five children; Georgia Lee, Rice, Pearl Florence, Ella Mae and George Foster. 

Amanda Brumley

Amanda Brumley-Gilmore-Foster remained in Gasconade County, Missouri raising their family as per the census of 1900 and 1910. On December 1, 1919 died at the age of 64 of Cerebral Apoplexy (Stroke). She was buried at the Methodist Cemetery in Rosebud, Missouri.

Amanda Brumley

My mother, Nancy Gertrude Brumley Weik and I always had questions about Amanda Brumley and her marriages. We talked to other relatives who knew her directly and they never did confide in us about why she left her Gilmore family and started a new family with another person. Again, one of those mystery women in our Brumley Branches Genealogy that has been hard to track down over the years.

 

 

Rubie Jemima Pultz Weik

Rubie Jemima Pultz Weik

Sunday's Obituary

Rubie Jemima Pultz Weik was my paternal grandmother. She was born on September 14, 1889 around Fremont, Clarke, Iowa. Her parents were George Edward Pultz and Kate Anna Smith. Rubie Jemima Pultz Weik was the 5th child out of thirteen siblings. As per the 1900 Kansas Census, Rubie's father had brought the family to settle in Leonardville, Riley, Kansas. 

Rubie Jemima Pultz married Otto Richard Weik (my grandfather) on February 20, 1908 in Riley County, Kansas. They worked a farm in a small little community called Keats, as they started their family together. To this marriage, they  had seven children; Leo John, Hugh Edward, Don Charles, Lola Mae, Elsie Elizabeth, Ina Marie and Merle Otto Weik (my father).

On July 16, 1926, Rubie Jemima Pultz Weik's world changed drastically. Otto Richard Weik had been kicked by a horse and he did not recover from his injuries. She was now a widow, living on a farm with seven children to raise by herself. All the children had to work the farm even the smallest child, Merle Otto Weik. Over the years, I heard many stories of how they had to work together to make the farm work and be somewhat profitable.

It was a hard life, especially during the Great Depression of the 30's and the Dust Bowl days in Kansas. As her children grew older it was then time to see the boys leave the farm to service their country in WW II. Fewer people to help with the farm. As per, the 1940 Kansas Census she had moved to Pottawatomie County on the other side of Riley County, Kansas. At that time, it was just Rubie and my father (Merle Otto) living in a farm-house.

By 1956, Rubie Jemima Pultz Weik had moved to back to town which was Manhattan, Riley, Kansas. I remember visiting her house many times as we traveled from Illinois to Kansas every summer to see her and my aunts, uncles and cousins. 

As the years progressed and her health was failing she went into a nursing home in Manhattan and remained there until her death on June 3, 1973. She had accomplished what others could not do in difficult times, raising her family by herself and working the family farm. She worked hard but never forgot where she came from and the values she learned as a child coming from a large family. 

Rubie Jemima Pultz Weik

Rubie Jemima Pultz Weik